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What you need to know about COVID-19: Global cases pass 10 million, only 2 US states report decline

as we see new cases rising and we’re tracking them very carefully. There may be a tendency among the American people to think that we are. We are back to that place that we were two months ago. The reality is we’re in a much better place. But yesterday we saw more new cases in this country than ever before. Was all 50 states air opening up our country again. People are going back to work. No mention of the at least 11 states that are now pausing or rolling back reopening. We have an exponential rise in many places and we’re not locked down, so it makes me very worried about where we’re going to be. A month from now. At noon in Texas, the bars were ordered to close ones more. Houston is now recommending people stay home again. Clearly, we opened up too fast too soon. In my district in the Rio Grande Valley, we had a 700% increase in just the last 30 days in Texas. There are now more new cases and Mork over 19 patients in the hospital than ever before. My only concern is are these restrictions too late? Are they enough in Florida, Day reopening began mid May. Fewer than 1000 new cases were reported today, nearly 9000 again an all time record high. They just outlawed alcohol consumption and bars again. Still no statewide mask order. But Miami will now find anyone who won’t wear one, hoping that helps. We really don’t want to have to go backwards and undo some of the openings and potentially re imposed a state homework, but you can’t discount that option as a possibility. Meanwhile, some of those Northeast states hit hard early now hoping toe have kids back into modified classrooms. Come the fall, I can tell you. Plan A is a maximum number of kids in schools. Testing must increase, say the experts. The White House task force now considering what’s called pool testing. You pull the blood of a bunch of people and tested. If negative, they’re all clear. If positive, then you take the time to test everyone. Individually. Pooling would give us the capacity to go from 1/2 a 1,000,000 tests today to potentially five million individuals tested to that per day,

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What you need to know about COVID-19: Global cases pass 10 million, only 2 US states report decline

Only two U.S. states are reporting a decline in new coronavirus cases compared to last week — Connecticut and Rhode Island.A staggering rise was reported in 36 states, including Florida, which some experts have cautioned could be the next epicenter.Florida reported 9,585 new coronavirus cases Saturday, a single-day record high since the start of the pandemic. The number rivals that of New York’s peak in daily cases in early April.While Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said the state’s surge in cases in the past week was the result of a “test dump,” officials there and across the U.S. have also warned of an increase in cases among younger groups. The Latest NumbersThe United States has surpassed 2.5 million infections and more than 125,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.Globally, the case count hit more than 10 million with close to 500,000 deaths. The Florida Department of Health reported more than 8,500 new coronavirus cases Sunday.The daunting numbers could just be the tip of the iceberg: A new survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the total number of coronavirus infections across the U.S. could actually be six to 24 times greater than reported. Where new cases are on the riseThe 36 states seeing a rise in cases include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington State, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.Cases are trekking steady in Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Virginia.States hit pause on reopeningAt least 12 states halted or rolled back their reopening plans in hopes of curbing the spread of the virus.Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee announced Saturday he’s hitting the pause button on the state’s reopening plan due to rising cases. Some counties were preparing to enter the fourth phase of reopening, “which would essentially mean no restrictions,” the governor’s office said in a statement.”Phase 4 would mean a return to normal activity and we can’t do that now,” the statement said. “This is an evolving situation and we will continue to make decisions based on the data.” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott also announced last week he’d pause any further phases to reopen the state.”I ask all Texans to do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing a mask, washing their hands regularly, and socially distancing from others. The more that we all follow these guidelines, the safer our state will be and the more we can open up Texas for business.”A day later, Abbott also said he was closing bars and limiting restaurant capacity.Arizona’s governor has also announced the state’s reopening is on pause as a result of a major spike in cases.”We expect that our numbers will be worse next week and the week following,” the governor said. Pleas to young groupsIn recent days, officials across the U.S. have reported a rise in cases among younger groups. In Mississippi, officials pointed to fraternity parties as one of the drivers behind the state’s cases.California Gov. Gavin Newsom said last week there’s been an increase in younger groups testing positive for the virus.”There is a sense that a lot of young people, well you’re young so you feel a little bit more invincible but, respectfully, often that can be a selfish mindset,” Newsom said.In Florida, DeSantis said while the median age for those infected with the virus in March was in the 60s, in the past two to three weeks it’s dropped to people in their early 30s.The governor urged younger groups to be vigilant, saying while they may not be at risk for serious complications, they can pass the virus on to someone who is. The state’s community transmission, he said, is “being driven by that 18 to 35-year-old group.””You have a responsibility to be careful if you’re in contact with somebody who is more vulnerable,” he said. “We’ve been stressing avoiding the three Cs which are: closed spaces with poor ventilation, crowded places with many people nearby and close-contact settings, such as close-range conversations.”Stop the spread of COVID-19To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the CDC recommends you wear a cloth face cover over your nose and mouth while in public and stay 6 feet away from other people.You are also asked to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.

Only two U.S. states are reporting a decline in new coronavirus cases compared to last week — Connecticut and Rhode Island.

A staggering rise was reported in 36 states, including Florida, which some experts have cautioned could be the next epicenter.

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Florida reported 9,585 new coronavirus cases Saturday, a single-day record high since the start of the pandemic. The number rivals that of New York’s peak in daily cases in early April.

While Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said the state’s surge in cases in the past week was the result of a “test dump,” officials there and across the U.S. have also warned of an increase in cases among younger groups.

The Latest Numbers

The United States has surpassed 2.5 million infections and more than 125,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Globally, the case count hit more than 10 million with close to 500,000 deaths.

The Florida Department of Health reported more than 8,500 new coronavirus cases Sunday.

The daunting numbers could just be the tip of the iceberg: A new survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests the total number of coronavirus infections across the U.S. could actually be six to 24 times greater than reported.

Where new cases are on the rise

The 36 states seeing a rise in cases include: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington State, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Cases are trekking steady in Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Hampshire New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Virginia.

States hit pause on reopening

At least 12 states halted or rolled back their reopening plans in hopes of curbing the spread of the virus.

Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee announced Saturday he’s hitting the pause button on the state’s reopening plan due to rising cases. Some counties were preparing to enter the fourth phase of reopening, “which would essentially mean no restrictions,” the governor’s office said in a statement.

“Phase 4 would mean a return to normal activity and we can’t do that now,” the statement said. “This is an evolving situation and we will continue to make decisions based on the data.”

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott also announced last week he’d pause any further phases to reopen the state.

“I ask all Texans to do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing a mask, washing their hands regularly, and socially distancing from others. The more that we all follow these guidelines, the safer our state will be and the more we can open up Texas for business.”

A day later, Abbott also said he was closing bars and limiting restaurant capacity.

Arizona’s governor has also announced the state’s reopening is on pause as a result of a major spike in cases.

“We expect that our numbers will be worse next week and the week following,” the governor said.

Pleas to young groups

In recent days, officials across the U.S. have reported a rise in cases among younger groups. In Mississippi, officials pointed to fraternity parties as one of the drivers behind the state’s cases.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom said last week there’s been an increase in younger groups testing positive for the virus.

“There is a sense that a lot of young people, well you’re young so you feel a little bit more invincible but, respectfully, often that can be a selfish mindset,” Newsom said.

In Florida, DeSantis said while the median age for those infected with the virus in March was in the 60s, in the past two to three weeks it’s dropped to people in their early 30s.

The governor urged younger groups to be vigilant, saying while they may not be at risk for serious complications, they can pass the virus on to someone who is. The state’s community transmission, he said, is “being driven by that 18 to 35-year-old group.”

“You have a responsibility to be careful if you’re in contact with somebody who is more vulnerable,” he said. “We’ve been stressing avoiding the three Cs which are: closed spaces with poor ventilation, crowded places with many people nearby and close-contact settings, such as close-range conversations.”

Stop the spread of COVID-19

To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the CDC recommends you wear a cloth face cover over your nose and mouth while in public and stay 6 feet away from other people.

You are also asked to wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

For more tips on how to stay safe, CLICK HERE.

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